DOG CARE

Your one-stop-hub to harness expert advice on All Things Dog.
Explore our tips and advice for every aspect of your dog’s care and enjoy
the benefits of a canine companion who is happy, healthy and content.
  • How dog change your life
    How Can Getting a Dog Change Your Life?
  • Get a new dog
    What to Consider Before You Get a New Dog?
  • Dog Care
    Benefits of having a dog
  • Let's adopt a dog
    Let's Adopt a Dog!

How Can Getting a Dog Change Your Life?

Bringing a dog into your home is the first step in creating a bond that can make both of your lives better. From giving you a reason to get in your walking shoes and go out to walk, to unleashing the ‘responsible’ you, to helping you socialize with other dog-owners, we think you’ll find that a dog can change your life in all kinds of positive ways.

What to Consider Before You Get a New Dog?

THINK ABOUT THE BASIC CARE & TRAINING YOU’LL NEED TO PROVIDE FOR YOUR NEW PET For any relationship to become successful, you have to start with the basics. Pay attention to simple details like choosing the most cozy and safe place in your house for the dog to rest, and keeping sufficient toys and other necessary supplies handy for the dog’s playtime. Also, take out enough time in the beginning for the dog’s training.
Good planning will ensure a smooth transition and the chance to establish a healthy bond right away.

ESTABLISH YOUR FAMILY’S ROLES Adopting a dog is like welcoming a new family member. There’s something for everyone in your family to do when it comes to looking after your new dog. Just ensure that all family members have a clear understanding of their roles in the care-taking and that they all treat the dog in the same consistent manner.

PLAN FOR COSTS Plan ahead and consider the budget for all the care your dog will need, including visiting the veterinarian, taking training classes, toys & food.

Benefits of having a dog

Dogs Can Increase Our Happiness and Well-Being You may sense that hanging out with a dog or even looking at pictures of a dog gives your mood a boost, and there’s proof that it does. A chemical called oxytocin, which has been found to reduce stress, fight depression and create feelings of trust, increases significantly – for humans and dogs alike – when they spend as little as 30 minutes together. Glad the feeling is mutual!

Pets Can Be Good for Our Children A pet at home can instill the sense of responsibility in your kids at an early age. There are several more benefits for children, like:

Teaching kids to care for a puppy can make them more cooperative and generous

When kids imagine how a pet feels, it helps them learn to empathize with their peers and take their feelings into account

Teaching children to confide in their pets as if they were friends can help children recover from trauma

Pets Can Help Us Deal with Stress You may have heard about a hormone called cortisol, which is released when we’re stressed out, and is often coupled with heightened blood pressure. Over time, these factors can lead to high cholesterol and hypertension. Luckily, reducing stress can be as simple as interacting with a dog, which may help lower cortisol levels and improve your immune system’s functions.

Let's Adopt a Dog!

Now that you know how awesome dogs are, it’s time to decide where you should go to start your search for your furry friend. Some people looking for a specific breed may want to go to a breeder. If you’re looking for a dog based on personality, you have many options. You could visit a shelter, a rescue organization, a pet shop or a foster home.

SHELTER It’s a delight that we have some remarkable institutions that showcase immense care and concern for the strayed and abandoned dogs. A shelter is a housing facility for surrendered or stray animals operated by an organization dedicated to pet welfare.

RESCUE A rescue organization, like a shelter, is also dedicated to pet welfare. Rescue organizations care for a relatively small number of animals through a network of private foster homes, rather than in an animal shelter.

FOSTER HOME Foster homes provide temporary, in-home care for one or more animals on behalf of an animal shelter or animal rescue organization. Foster caregivers are usually volunteers of animal welfare organizations or shelters, and may foster animals for a number of different reasons. Foster homes are often needed for pets that are not yet ready for adoption (sick, injured, recovering from surgery, not yet weaned, needing socialization or other behavior modification, etc.) or pets for whom there is not enough space in the shelter. Some rescue groups operate completely through a network of foster homes.

Wherever you choose to get your dog, we hope we’ve helped you find a companion that will make your life richer, more loving, and more adventurous.

  • Dog Care
    Our Global Nutrition Philosophy
  • Dog Care
    What Do Dogs Need to Thrive?
  • Dog Care
    What goes into dog food?
  • Dog Care
    Should I give my dog a raw diet?

Our Global Nutrition Philosophy

We’re pet lovers ourselves, and we believe all pets deserve nutrition that goes beyond industry standards. From advancing the way kibble is made to employing over 400 scientists and nutritionists globally, we work continually to push pet nutrition forward for dogs everywhere.

What Do Dogs Need to Thrive?

Dogs, just like humans, have complex nutritional needs. It can be hard for owners to understand every facet of what their dog needs, but they needn’t look beyond their pet food. PURINA® complete pet foods provide a 100% complete and balanced diet for pets. At PURINA®, we reflect dogs’ natural needs using our quality ingredients. One common misconception is that dogs are carnivores. The reality is that even their wolf ancestors eat only 70% meat. Today’s dogs are omnivores, built to consume a more balanced diet – and that’s a good thing. Depending on the breed, dogs can live twice as long as wolves.

What goes into dog food?

PROTEIN SOURCES FROM MEAT, FISH OR POULTRY Real meat provides the flavours dogs love and the high-quality protein they need.

DIETARY FAT AND OMEGA FATTY ACIDS Dietary fats are a rich source of energy. Essential fatty acids are key in the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins.

VITAMINS AND MINERALS A mix of vitamins and minerals provides complete and balanced nutrition while supporting a healthy immune system and promoting a shiny, healthy coat.

Should I give my dog a raw diet?

Raw diets may not provide dogs with the complete and balanced nutrition they need. These diets may also expose dogs to the threat of food-borne pathogens.

  • Dog Food
    Tips for feeding puppies
  • Dog Food
    Choosing the best puppy food
  • Your Guide to puppies
  • Dog Care
    Do’s & Don’ts

Tips for feeding puppies

When it comes to feeding puppies, it’s not just a matter of feeding leftovers or what your adult dog is eating. Puppies need specific foods that cater to their growing bodies. The first year of life is critical in your puppy’s development. Your puppy has a lot of growing to do and needs a well-balanced diet. At certain times during their growth and development, a puppy requires up to twice the amount of some nutrients, and up to three times the calories per kilogram of bodyweight, of that of an adult dog. As you feed your puppy, you need to supply all the body building nutrients it requires to grow and develop: protein for strong muscles, water for hydration, calcium for strong bones and teeth, iron for healthy blood and enough calories for all the energy a puppy burns. This is easily accomplished when you feed a commercially prepared puppy formula that is complete and balanced.

Choosing the best puppy food

Give your puppy the healthiest start in life by choosing the best puppy food for him.

DOG FOOD FOR THOUGHT Even before your puppy comes home, you should decide on a puppy food. It has to be healthy and tasty, and it also needs to fit your lifestyle.

DOG FOOD NUTRITIONAL TIPS Read the label for nutritional claims.
Look for life stage claims. For example, foods appropriate for puppies should state they are complete and balanced for “growth” NOTE: Foods balanced for “the maintenance of an adult dog” won’t give a puppy the correct nutrition for their growing bodies.

Your Guide to puppies

The arrival of a new puppy is a wonderful time, but we know it can be an anxious one too. When you bring home a new puppy, there inevitably needs to be some time for adjustment. But in this first week you can lay the foundation for a long and happy life together and make the transition as easy as possible for everyone involved. With any luck you’ll have planned ahead, so you’ll have all the supplies, food and toys you’ll need for your new arrival. In addition, your house should be completely puppy-proof. So now all you have to think about in your puppy’s first week are the following handy hints to make the experience as stress-free as possible for up both.

MAKE TIME FOR YOUR PUPPY The best time to bring your new puppy home is at the beginning of a weekend. If possible, take a few days holiday as well to really give you time to acquaint your puppy with its new home and begin puppy training.

NAME YOUR PUPPY Agree on a name ahead of time and make sure everyone uses it all the time when talking to your puppy. This will help him recognise his name and avoid confusion

TAKE YOUR PUPPY TO THE VET Take your new puppy to your vet as soon as you can. Take with you any immunisation or other health information you may have received when you got your dog.

MAKE SURE OTHERS UNDERSTAND YOUR DOG’S NEEDS Once in his new home, your puppy will take time to adjust to strange new surroundings and people. Children can become especially excited, so explain to them that their new friend needs time out for naps, and show them how to care for your puppy and play nicely.

BE A LEADER Simple things like always walking through doors ahead of your puppy and eating in his presence before you feed him make you look like a ‘pack leader’. This will make it easier for your puppy to accept that you (and your family) are in charge.

PUPPY FEEDING TIPS It is a good idea to bring home the pet food that your new puppy had been eating to make the transition to a new home as easy as possible. If you do plan to switch foods, you can minimize digestive upsets by having enough of the old food available to make the change a gradual one. Always put the food in the same spot to establish a routine. If your puppy doesn’t seem to be eating, try moistening the food with water to make it easier to eat.

BE FAIR Never hit your puppy, and never scold for something he did a while ago. Your puppy will have no idea what the problem is and will think you are angry for no reason. Instead, encouraging the behaviour you do want and discouraging the ones you don’t want is a far more productive approach.

Do’s & Don’ts

Don’t bring home a new pet during busy times such as birthdays and holidays. The noise and confusion may frighten the pet and family members are generally too busy with the festivities to devote adequate time to help the puppy become comfortable in his new home.
Do make sure your entire family knows how to act, and agree on commands and rules. Complete cooperation from all family members is needed, as when a pet receives mixed signals, it can become confused and not know what to do. Above all, do have fun – puppies of all ages love a good time! And when a puppy is having fun, it’s a fair bet his owner is too.

  • Training to Find Your Dog's True Potential

Training to Find Your Dog's True Potential

At Purina, we believe that dogs are capable of a lot more than one might think. That’s why we’re always looking for new ways to train pets to unlock their true potential. Whether it’s training in athleticism, problem solving or even being a helpful companion for people in need, we see dogs doing new things every day.

The Power of Positive Reinforcement The behaviorists at Purina believe positive reinforcement is not only the best technique for establishing a good relationship with your dog while training, but that it’s also the most effective. Positive reinforcement consists of associating a reward with a desired behaviour. If you use positive reinforcement during training, your dog will learn to associate training time and behaving well with praise, affection or treats. Some forms of punishment training may lead to stress and anxiety for dogs and may weaken the relationship you have with your dog.

Training Tips Mostly, you will need a bit of patience and a willing pet. You will also need a small, tasty treat to reward your dog and a quiet room with no distractions to enable you and your dog to concentrate. It can be very helpful to join a training class for guidance, support and socialisation or work from a reputable dog-training book that uses a positive reinforcement method. Ensure you have suitable training aids or equipment to hand, such as clicker, harness, lead and so on. Once your dog is performing a certain task reliably, you can start to ask him to do this in a ‘real’ situation. You can train a dog to perform almost any task with clear, concise commands and a suitable reward.

TRAINING RULES

Keep training sessions short and sweet. It’s better to do six five-minute sessions than one half-hour stint each day – young puppies often lose concentration easily.

Only train when you are in a good mood, or you may take your stress out on your pet.

Always end training sessions on a positive note with an exercise you know your dog can do easily, so you finish with the taste of success.

At first, train with no distractions. Establish what you are trying to teach in a quiet environment and only add distractions later, so that your dog learns to respond in a range of environments.

Training must always be reward-based – treats, toys, games and cuddles. Negative, compulsive, punishing techniques are cruel and don’t work. Never use a choke or check chain as you can injure your dog’s neck very easily. If you need more physical control, fit a head collar.

Training your dog is an excellent way for you to bond with him and ensure a strong and healthy relationship.

TREATS Treats can help you use positive reinforcement to train your dog. Just make sure treats never comprise more than 10% of your dog’s daily caloric intake.

  • Understanding Your Dog's Basic Needs

Understanding Your Dog's Basic Needs

FOOD & WATER From providing a complete and balanced diet to helping your dog avoid the risks of obesity, what you feed your dog is essential.

ATTENTION & LOVE One of the reasons we at PURINA® love dogs so much is that they provide us with unconditional love. But just like they provide us with affection, dogs need plenty of affection from us. Make sure you spend plenty of time with your dog so that he becomes properly socialized and feels like a valued part of your household.

EXERCISE Don’t let that pup lay around on the couch all day! Dogs are active creatures, and need plenty of exercise and stimulation. Bonus: Frequent activity helps keep your dog fit.

A COMFORTABLE LIVING SPACE Make sure your home is comfortable and stimulating for your dog. From providing a safe place for him to peruse your backyard and smell the scents of nature to leaving him a comfy bed to rest on, there’s a lot you can do to make sure he feels welcome and at home.

TAGS & IDENTIFICATION Make sure your dog can always find his way home. A collar with an I.D. tag, including his name and your phone number, can make it simple for anyone that may find him to return him to your home.

SUPPLIES Make sure you have unbreakable food and water bowls, a collar, a leash and plenty of comfy bedding, not to mention stimulating toys that keep your dog active.

  • Dog health care
    PARTNER WITH A VETERINARIAN

PARTNER WITH A VETERINARIAN

Regular veterinary visits should begin as soon as you acquire your new dog. In the case of puppies, they do get some immunity from their mothers; however, this immunity begins to decrease soon after they are weaned. Puppies should be vaccinated against canine diseases and checked periodically for worms and other parasites.

Allergies & Intolerances Environmental contaminants, such as dust and mould, can cause allergies in a dog. So can his food, although it takes time to make that diagnosis. Usually, a veterinarian will put a dog on a food elimination diet to determine if he has a food allergy. That means the dog spends eight to ten weeks on a special hypoallergenic diet. If his clinical signs improve on the hypoallergenic diet, he is then challenged with his original diet. If the dog is truly allergic to his food there is likely to be an increase in clinical signs, such as itching and inflamed skin. If these appear, further testing will be needed to determine which specific ingredients trigger the allergy symptoms.

Digestive Health Digestive upset is one of the most common reasons dogs are brought to the veterinarian. There are many causes for digestive problems in dogs, including dietary indiscretion, infections, and allergies. Some dog digestive problems may resolve once the dog’s digestive system is given a chance to rest, but more serious conditions could result in weight loss, dehydration and debilitation. If your dog has a digestive problem, contact your veterinarian and they can determine the appropriate treatment.

Diabetes Diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin, the hormone that regulates how sugar is absorbed and used by cells and tissues in the body. It most often afflicts dogs between the ages of five and seven, and female dogs are more susceptible to it than males. If you notice your dog is suddenly extremely thirsty and urinates more than usual, consult your veterinarian, as these behaviours may be signs of diabetes.

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